Tucson Wildlife Center

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BEHIND THE SCENES Tour – The Sam Goldman Wildlife Hospital

Tucson Wildlife Center, Inc. has been rescuing sick, injured, and orphaned wild animals for 24 years. Our largely volunteer-operated nonprofit provides rescue and release services, medical care, and on-site rehabilitation all free of charge to the public. Tucson Wildlife Center’s Sam Goldman Wildlife Hospital is the only 24/7/365 hospital in Southern Arizona dedicated to caring…

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BEHIND THE SCENES SPOTLIGHT: Tim, Wildlife Care Volunteer

Shortly after relocating to Tucson last year, Tim started looking for wildlife volunteer opportunities. Previously he had volunteered at Wildlife Images Rehabilitation Center in Grants Pass, Oregon, and when he discovered Tucson Wildlife Center, he happily joined our team as a Wildlife Care Volunteer. Most of Tim’s time is spent preparing food and feeding the…

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Patient of the Week: Barn Owl Fledglings

With their unique heart-shaped faces, these four Barn Owl fledglings recently stole the show at the Mescal Movie Set near Benson. One of the most recognizable western cinematic towns on the big screen, these siblings were found in the movie set hotel that is being remodeled. After a week of observation, and seeing no signs…

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Patient of the Week: Desert Horned Lizard

Recently, this Desert Horned Lizard was brought to Tucson Wildlife Center after being cut by a weed-eater. After examination, our medical staff cleaned and treated the wounds. In rehab, this lizard has made quick progress in mending its injuries and will soon be released back into its natural habitat. Horned Lizards are sometimes called Horned…

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Patient of the Week: Behind the Scenes – Baby Bird and Small Animal Wing, “The Orphanage”

Tucson Wildlife Center is dedicated to the rescue, emergency medical care, rehabilitation, and release of sick, injured, and orphaned wildlife. During “baby season” from March until September, TWC’s Baby Bird and Small Mammal Wing, the Orphanage, typically cares for over 2,000 orphaned birds and small mammals. Orphaned bunnies whose mothers have been killed and baby…

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BEHIND THE SCENES SPOTLIGHT: Karen, Wildlife Care Specialist

Upon retiring from her job as a medical doctor with Indian Health Service in 2017, Karen began looking for volunteer opportunities to fill some of her free time. Previously, she had served as a foster parent to newborn puppies for the Pima Animal Control Center (PACC) and considered starting again but thought it would be…

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Patient of the Week – Update: Juvenile Barn Owls

These Barn Owls came into Tucson Wildlife Center’s care at different times and under different circumstances, but soon these nine juvenile owls will all take flight. (Barn Owls can have a clutch of up to 18 eggs!) Four siblings were found between bales of hay in a truck that was making a delivery to Tucson;…

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Patient of the Week: Juvenile Cooper’s Hawks

Did you know that colliding with a window is one of the most common injuries in birds? Windows often reflect an image of a bird’s habitat, including vegetation and open sky, causing them to fly at full speed into the glass. From broken bones and beaks to severe head and spinal trauma, a window collision…

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BEHIND THE SCENES SPOTLIGHT: Janet, Wildlife Care Shift Leader

When Janet first discovered Tucson Wildlife Center, she had no idea such a place existed. She had previously been a docent at zoos in Syracuse and Detroit and thought she would volunteer at Reid Park Zoo. But when their training schedule was not convenient for her, she began searching for other opportunities to work with…

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Release Radar: Orphaned Rock Squirrels

These five sibling Rock Squirrels got off to a rocky start in life when they were orphaned right after they were born. Luckily, a construction crew discovered them covered in fiberglass, but still alive, under a pool they were constructing and brought them to Tucson Wildlife Center. When they arrived, the squirrel kits still had…

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Patient of the Week: Juvenile Ravens

[Sound on for Video below text] These juvenile Ravens are among many young birds, of varying species, arriving at Tucson Wildlife Center this summer emaciated, and in most cases, suffering from injuries. The long-term drought is testing many bird species’ ability to survive in hotter and drier conditions. Nestlings and fledglings such as these young…

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Patient of the Week: Baby Opossum

This baby opossum was brought to Tucson Wildlife Center after his mother and siblings were hit and killed by a car. Estimated to be about 12 weeks old, he had suffered a head injury. Since arriving at TWC his condition has continued to improve, and we are happy to report that his chances of a…

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For help and emergencies, please call our 24/7 helpline at (520) 290-9453.

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