Tucson Wildlife Center

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All in the Family

A white-nosed coatimundi and a young raccoon are temporarily at home at Tucson Wildlife Center while under observation for rabies. Both are members of the same family Procyonids that includes Raccoons, Coati’s and Ringtails.  Rabies is a deadly virus, transmitted through the bite and saliva of an infected animal.  The coati was cornered by 2…

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Millions for Tucson Raffle

The Jim Click Automotive Team is presenting a new 2021 Ford Bronco Sport to the entire community to be used as the featured prize in our ongoing effort to raise millions of dollars for non-profit organizations in Southern Arizona. With your $25 contribution (or 5 tickets for $100) you could win this stunning vehicle or…

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Happy Earth Day!

Every animal at the Tucson Wildlife Center is an Earth Day story. One is poisoned, one is orphaned when its mother was shot, and on and on. But together we can help them all. These are serious intrusions into their lives but the most serious is yet to come – sustained drought. We can all…

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Thanks for Supporting Our Cause

Thank you for helping all the wildlife get a fighting chance.  Thank You for your Support You made double the impact this Arizona Gives Day!! THANK YOU!! #GivingTuesday! #GivingTuesday is a global day of giving fueled by the power of social media and collaboration. This year, with your help, we made a difference! THANKS FOR…

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Leave the Screeching to my Eastern Cousin!

Did you know that the western screech owl’s call is a melodic short series of hoots that accelerate at the end? It’s the eastern screech owls call that earned these owls their name. Found in a variety of wooded areas as well as urban areas and parks these small grey owls take up residence in…

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Captivating Kestrels Rebounding

In the world of raptors few if any can rival the the beauty of America’s smallest member of the Falcon family, the American kestrel. Fierce and determined hunters, kestrels need open areas with a few trees for nest cavities in which to raise their young. Roadside fence posts, telephone poles and wires provide the perfect…

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From Tucson Wildlife Center, by Kathy Carter

It’s Tucson’s Spring when snowballs fall. From tallest heights of towering palms, and Sycamore, Eucalyptus and Piñon Pine.For up above in crowded nests, young owlets, Cooper’s, and Red Tails grow round and downy feathered and hot from such an ethereal perch.Crazy though it seems they leap, a long, death defying plummet to land below in…

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Survival of the Fittest

An injured greater sandhill crane is recovering at Tucson Wildlife Center after surgery to repair two broken bones in its right wing. Spotted in mid January, the crane evaded capture until the recent Wings Over Wilcox Birding and Nature Festival when it was kept at bay by a German short-haired pointer allowing Arizona Game and…

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Getting the Lead Out

If you are one of Nature’s clean up crew, a turkey vulture, you are picky about what you eat.  Freshly dead meat, between one and three days dead is preferred. Birds can not chew, and every hunk of meat a vulture swallows may include a few extras; insects, whole lead bullets or fragments of lead bullets. …

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Newsworthy Red-tailed Hawk Recovering

A red-tailed hawk found on the highway and rescued by a benevolent citizen is recovering at Tucson Wildlife Center. The hawk, cold, covered in snow and dazed suffered a severe concussion from impact with a vehicle. It spent the evening with its rescuer before being brought to the center for medical attention. X-rays showed an…

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There’s No Place Like Home

Recently we shared the successful recovery and release of a peaceful javelina named Fridita.  We’re happy to report thanks to  follow up by her benefactor, that Fridita has reunited with her family herd.  Although the property owner had never seen the herd prior to reaching out to Tucson Wildlife Center for help, the day Fridita was…

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For help and emergencies, please call our 24/7 helpline at (520) 290-9453.

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